HISPANIC TRADITIONAL ARTS OF NEW MEXICO

HISPANIC TRADITIONAL ARTS OF NEW MEXICO

Sep 18, 2011 to Jan 8, 2012

Since its founding in 1967, The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History has quietly built an impressive and diverse collection of Hispanic Traditional Art from across the state. This exhibition, celebrating masterworks and little known gems from the permanent collection of The Museum, will provide a broad reaching exploration of the historical development and contemporary new directions in Hispanic traditional art.

From the colonial era to the present, Hispanic artists in New Mexico have contributed significantly to all art forms. Traditions such as religious image-making, weaving and colcha embroidery, furniture making, silverwork, straw appliqué, and tinwork have been practiced in New Mexico in some cases for more than four hundred years, and artists continue to create innovative interpretations using historical techniques. By modifying and adding their personal visions, contemporary artists keep the early aesthetics, traditional utility, subject matter, and materials alive. Providing a bold and compelling introduction to the continuing impact of the state’s rich Hispanic visual heritage, this exhibition will place historic objects from the 19th and early 20th centuries beside passionate and dynamic recent examples of the art form.

The exhibition will include masterworks from the traditions of religious image making, weaving, colcha embroidery, and filigree jewelry and will also include examples of tinwork and straw appliqué. Many additional important objects in these traditions as well as furniture and architectural woodworking can be seen in The Museum’s history exhibition, Four Centuries: A History of Albuquerque, and at The Museum’s historic site, Casa San Ysidro, the Gutiérrez/Minge House, located in Corrales.

In addition to historic objects, the exhibition includes works of art by many contemporary artists. The Museum’s collection is remarkably broad in scope; it was developed as a celebration of both adherence to historic precedent and innovation within the revival of tradition. From the beginning The Museum purchased work by artists who broke new ground within the revival movement in the 1970s and thus the collection contains some very surprising and unexpected early work by artists who later became masters of the tradition.
 

IMAGE: Monica Sosaya-Halford, Reredo, 1982, acrylic and gesso on pine, Gift of Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc.,1982.201.1
 

THIS EXHIBITION AND ITS RELATED PROGRAMMING ARE MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF STATE FARM INSURANCE.

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